“It’s human nature to stretch, to go, to see, to understand. Exploration is not a choice, really; it’s an imperative.”

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Robotic rovers — the wheeled vehicles decked out with solar panels and cameras — have been slowly racking up mileage on the Martian surface since 2004, when Spirit and Opportunity dropped in for a look around. If you’re counting, there are five rovers there now: Sojourner, Opportunity, Spiri…

Warmer weather is arriving just as the pandemic loosens its grasp on our daily lives. New Englanders are being vaccinated at a pace that outstrips their fellow Americans, and with a newfound sense of security comes a desire to leave the house and head for the woods.

Words are inadequate to describe the depth of evil visited upon humanity at the Nazi complex in Auschwitz.

Flowers are blooming and so is COVID-19. And at the risk of sounding like a scold, a combination of warmth and a neighbor’s vaccination shouldn’t lure us to lower our masks and start standing too close to strangers at Market Basket.

When it’s time to talk about New England sports heroes, the names that immediately jump to mind are Ted Williams, Bill Russell, Bobby Orr and Tom Brady.

Even amid their tortured rollout, it is well worth the time to pause and again appreciate the stunning scientific achievement represented by the vaccines against COVID-19.

With the solemnity befitting his office and empathy born from his own family tragedies, Joe Biden paid homage Feb. 22 to the more than 500,000 people who have died in the U.S. from the coronavirus.

Surrounded as we are by breakdowns of science, engineering and imagination — just ask anyone who's tried to navigate the online system to register for a COVID-19 vaccination — an image from a Mars rover landing the same day more than 129 million miles away was a refreshing reminder of the co…

Coronavirus was just surging across China this time last year — more than 1,770 deaths had been tallied since the outbreak began in December — and was seeping over oceans and across borders into other parts of Asia. Americans exposed while on a cruise ship were being flown by chartered jet f…

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There’s a story about Henry Aaron breaking into major league baseball that surely resonates with any Red Sox fan. The Milwaukee Braves were playing in spring training against the Boston Red Sox in Sarasota, Florida, on March 14, 1954, the story goes, when a 20-year-old kid called up to repla…

Bill Belichick has accumulated more wins as an NFL coach than anyone else alive, with the single exception of Don Shula. His teams have won more playoff games, won more conference championships and won more Super Bowls than those of any other NFL coach, living or dead. His trophy case runneth over.

Among the more striking images taken the day of the last presidential inauguration, on Jan. 20, 2017, were those showing President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama greeting President-elect Donald Trump and future First Lady Melania Trump at the White House.

With each new year comes a crop of familiar resolutions: Exercise more and eat less. Spend less time in front of the TV and more time with your friends. Travel more, and really see the world.

Fairness dictates that New Hampshire workers who’ve been cut off by COVID-19 from their offices in Massachusetts should not have to pay income tax on work they do at home. If fortune has blessed them so that they may keep their jobs while teleworking from their kitchens or living rooms, the …

Given all we’ve been dealing with for the last 10 months, it’s easy to pass on doing the little things, like making sure your car is completely clear of snow and ice before you hit the highway.

It seems like you can’t go anywhere without driving by an Amazon Prime van pulled to the curb for a delivery at almost any hour of the day or night. And if it’s not an Amazon van, it’s a U.S. Postal Service truck dropping off boxes with the Amazon “smile” logo on the side.

Given the rancor over politics and race in recent years and a growing anti-immigrant sentiment in some quarters, the data from the FBI’s hate crime report for 2019 should come as no surprise.

We celebrated a few weeks ago when the U.S. Census Bureau announced it had nearly completed its decennial count of America’s population despite so much wrangling and litigation over deadlines. The bureau said it eventually contacted all but a tenth of a percent of the country’s households, r…

If you work in a city or town clerk’s office or showed up as a poll worker at the primary in September or the general election on Tuesday, this process was like none you’ve ever seen. 

This year’s presidential election is more consequential than any in three generations. The country is deep in crisis. A pandemic, a battered economy, racial unrest and a surge in extremist violence are crushing. The person we put in the White House for the next four years will face unique, d…

If there is an upside to the pandemic it’s been a decrease in people driving, which has meant less fossil fuel burned, resulting in cleaner air. 

Some disappointing news, for those of us who like to finish first, is that New Hampshire slides in at 24th among the states in terms of how many people took the initiative to stand up and be counted for the U.S. census. A self-response rate of nearly 67% puts us in the narrow space, statisti…

In this country, it’s rare that a book gets banned by the vote of a school board or library trustees. Censorship can be more subtle: a nagging parent raising the specter of homosexual indoctrination pressures a librarian to put the copy of the children’s book “And Tango Makes Three” into a d…

Hanging a screen in your kitchen where the world can peer inside used to be something that only happened on “The Jetsons” or an otherwise forgettable “Back to the Future” sequel. Now, science fiction is fact, and if you’re not careful casually pouring a cup of coffee while wearing your ratty…

Our skies are hazy with the cross-continental drift of smoke blowing from the West Coast wildfires, but that’s not why some people are holding their breath. A persistent drought — still somewhere between “moderate” and “severe” throughout Massachusetts and New Hampshire — and a hot summer ha…

With every new crisis, it seems, comes a new scheme aimed at defrauding unsuspecting consumers. Earlier in the coronavirus pandemic, we learned how scammers were targeting seniors by offering “free,” unsolicited COVID-19 tests to Medicare recipients. There were no tests, of course — it was a…

If being kicked out of college for a semester isn’t shameful enough, 11 students tossed from Northeastern University on Friday and their parents are out $36,534. That’s how much it costs to participate in the “N.U.in Program,” which usually involves some study abroad but was modified this ye…

Not stressing over a high-stakes college admissions test is to a high school junior what sleeping late is to a Saturday morning. If the apparent demise of SAT and ACT scores as benchmarks of young human potential were reduced to an analogy favored by the authors of those exams, maybe it woul…

The divide between Massachusetts and New Hampshire is as much about taxes as it is geography. The Granite State’s famous distaste for income or sales taxes — the “New Hampshire advantage,” it’s sometimes called — entices many who work in and around Boston to buy houses and move their familie…

There has been encouraging news on the COVID-19 vaccine front in recent weeks. In a matter of months, researchers across the globe have developed treatment approaches that are ready for large-scale testing.

It is difficult to not feel at least a small shred of hope in the news that at least one of the dozens of vaccines in development to fight COVID-19 has shown signs of efficacy in testing.

Nothing finds cracks in a pipe like a surge of water pressure, and nothing exposes the weak spots in a government agency or program like a crisis. It’s a lesson that could cost state unemployment agencies around the country as much as $26 billion, according to one official’s estimate.

Last year saw the lowest number of on-duty firefighter deaths in the U.S. since the National Fire Protection Association started keeping those records in 1977. The toll was 48, a grim statistic but still a sharp drop from the yearly average of 65 deaths.

Baseball is back. Sort of. No one is certain just how long it will last, and it’s going to look strange and unfamiliar while it’s here. And it will likely serve as a COVID-era test case for other sports — from the largest professional associations to U-8 youth soccer leagues — looking to hit…

“I honestly feel that it would be best for the country to keep baseball going. ... Baseball provides a recreation which does not last over two hours or two hours and a half, and which can be got for very little cost. And, incidentally, I hope that night games can be extended because it gives…

“I honestly feel that it would be best for the country to keep baseball going. ... Baseball provides a recreation which does not last over two hours or two hours and a half, and which can be got for very little cost. And, incidentally, I hope that night games can be extended because it gives…

More than one contagion has swept over us these past couple of weeks. We don’t just have the new coronavirus to worry about, there’s also the spread of bad information and the anxiety it creates. On both levels, we can protect ourselves.

If you don’t know what double-cupping is, you’re probably from away and prefer hot tea in a china cup to a large iced mocha with a double shot. 

When a person is considering suicide, access to a crisis call center is often a matter of life and death. Fortunately, there is much that can be done to make it easier for a person in pain to quickly and easily get the help they need.

A bucket brigade of spring water being pulled off store shelves early this month was just the start. With strict new limits on the appearance of certain man-made chemicals in the water, New Hampshire and states surrounding it are sure to see ripple effects — some of which will be costly.

The festival that overtook an alfalfa field at Max Yasgur’s dairy farm — and, really, the entire Catskills region — 50 years ago last Thursday was singular for its music. Thirty-three acts stretched over three days ranged in quality but left the world with unforgettable performances from the…

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